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    In Luck We Trust II [إحْياء من الآس البستوني] (Anything Goes, peaked at #1, 1977 points, 71-6 win-loss record)

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    Immanent God LANCE
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    In Luck We Trust II [إحْياء من الآس البستوني] (Anything Goes, peaked at #1, 1977 points, 71-6 win-loss record)

    Post by Immanent God LANCE on Sun 27 Mar - 2:59





    From 1995 to now nothing has changed
    Trainers far and wide have been in denial and deranged
    After two decades they still don't understand
    That victory and defeat are cards they draw to their hand
    In this game of Pokémon battling
    AKA glorified gambling
    To inflate their pride they've closed their eyes to the facts
    And scapegoat shit from this "game of skill" they supposedly detract
    They made the OHKO Clause
    The Evasion Clause
    And the Moody Clause
    Yet in spite of all that crap
    In Luck We Trust is still the rhythm to which we all rap
    With team matchups and 50/50s and hax
    We're still stuck in this casino and changin' no tracks
    Seems only one Living Legend is willin' to open his eyes
    To this reality covered by Smogon's and PO's lies
    The Great Pokémon Master the Immanent
    The Gambler of DaUniverse the Transcendent
    It was only shortly after In Luck We Trust was revealed
    That those filthy cowards demanded their egos filled
    But those motherfuckers ain't keepin' that team down
    The day would come when again in SwagPlay they'd drown
    The masterpiece of that team may have died
    But through a new metagame it has risen
    And now two years later it has come again
    Bitches, they call me Pokémon Trainer R The Resurrection
    The Ultimate Champion of perfection
    Time and time again
    Me and my team of pain
    Rise from the ashes like that phoenix behind its Substitute
    Far as Anything Goes is concened my power's absolute
    Once I draw the Ace of Spades this battle will be over
    But this time that card ain't just Sheer Cold Kyogre
    Swagger and Thunder Wave and Substitute and Foul Play
    Klefki returns twice as a nightmare for even Mega Ray
    Wanna play the odds against LLW?
    Even Numel won't pull you through
    Test your luck against me if you dare
    My Clefable still ain't aware
    So tell your Arceus to sheathe its swords
    From Dragon Rush to Dragon Masters to Heavenly Dragon Gods
    The legend of the Greatest Pokémon Master carries on
    Through the faces of the dice that govern "competitive" Pokémon!

    Welcome to my ninth Rate My Team thread, as well as my second of such for the ORAS Anything Goes metagame. Some people may remember that in my previous Rate My Team thread, I talked about a number of excellent teams I made in the past, which were no longer usable due to a change in the rules that govern the metagames in which they were used. One of such teams was In Luck We Trust, one of my favorite teams ever, which I made for the XY Ubers metagame prior to the Swagger ban. As Anything Goes is one of my primary Pokémon metagames at the moment, and Swagger is allowed in it, I decided to resurrect my old XY Ubers team in this metagame. Through that motivation, In Luck We Trust II [إحْياء من الآس البستوني] was born, and quickly became one of the most successful Anything Goes teams ever, as evident from the screenshot below:




    In any case, onto the team...

    The team at a glance:



    Team building process:

    As this team is based on In Luck We Trust, the most obvious starting point for this team was the aforementioned team.



    Although Thundurus-I does have certain minor advantages over Klefki as a SwagPlay user thanks to its different type combination, it is still overall far inferior to Klefki, and the only reason it was in the original In Luck We Trust was because the Species Clause in XY Ubers prevented me from using two Klefki. But since that clause does not exist in Anything Goes, I decided to replace Thundurus-I with another Klefki. In addition to that, the original In Luck We Trust used a combination of specially-defensive Groudon and specially-defensive Arceus-Water in order to tank Kyogre. But with the arrival of Primal Groudon and its ability to wall Kyogre thanks to its amazing Desolate Land Ability, I judged that the team's previous core was obsolete, so I gave my Groudon a Red Orb while replacing Arceus-Water with a physically-defensive Arceus-Ground, for its ability to easily beat and Defog against Primal Groudon, one of, if not the single most common Stealth Rock user in the Anything Goes metagame.

    For my Pokémon's nicknames, I decided to keep them as they were in my original team, in which the Arceus was nicknamed "Allah," while the other five Pokémon were named after the Five Pillars of Islam. But for purely aesthetic purposes, I decided to have all six of my Pokémon's nicknames written in Arabic rather than with English alphabetical letters.



    The first two problems I noticed with the team were that it was forced to sacrifice a Pokémon every time a Primal Kyogre switched into the team's Primal Groudon, and that it did not really have anything that could comfortably tank Ho-Oh as well as Mega Rayquaza's extremely powerful Dragon Ascent attack. As such, I replaced Primal Groudon and Arceus-Ground with a physically-defensive Arceus-Rock and a specially-defensive Arceus-Water, using the former for setting up Stealth Rock and the latter for using Defog while stalling out Primal Groudon and other Stealth Rock users with Toxic.



    I noticed that Arceus-Water was complete setup bait for the incredibly common Lum Berry Dragon Dance Mega Rayquaza, so I replaced its Splash Plate with a Draco Plate while keeping the same moves and EVs.



    However, I quickly learned that with Arceus-Dragon in place of Arceus-Water, the team was completely destroyed by Mega Diancie, so I put Arceus-Water back in.



    With this team, I reached top 10 on the ladder, but felt that Arceus-Water alone was hardly sufficient for countering Primal Kyogre, so I replaced Arceus-Rock with Primal Groudon, while hoping to play around Ho-Oh and Mega Rayquaza with a combination of Stealth Rock, Arceus-Water's Toxic and the team's two SwagKeys.



    However, the team's weakness to Ho-Oh and far more importantly Mega Rayquaza was ultimately far too crippling, as was its weakness to Life Orb Extreme Killer Arceus with Return or Frustration, which even Clefable could not stop. At that point, I remembered that in the original In Luck We Trust, Life Orb Substitute Ho-Oh served two primary purposes. The first was to break stall, which has always been the #1 enemy of the SwagPlay strategy. And the second was to take advantage of the mass-spreading of paralysis by the team's two Prankster Thunder Wave users against offensive teams. By repeatedly using Substitute and Roost with Ho-Oh against a paralyzed Pokémon until a turn ends in which Ho-Oh finds itself behind a Substitute thanks to the opponent's Pokémon being fully paralyzed on that turn, the opponent was likely to be forced to lose at least two Pokémon, due to the fact that the vast majority of Pokémon have a hard time stomaching Ho-Oh's unbelievably destructive Life Orb-boosted attacks.

    However, as excellent a strategy as that may have been in the XY Ubers metagame, I found that a different approach would be optimal for this new team in Anything Goes. While top-level trainers in XY Ubers such as Seele and myself may have established stall to be the most dominant playstyle in that metagame, such a playstyle, despite not being close to useless in any sense as demonstrated by the teams of several great Anything Goes players such as HunterStorm and Sage Hane, is overall still far less common and effective in Anything Goes than in XY Ubers. This is due to Darkrai's ability to brutally and mercilessly abuse the lack of Sleep Clause in this metagame, combined with the presence of other incredibly dangerous threats, such as the mascot of Anything Goes itself, Mega Rayquaza. As such, I found that sacrificing Ho-Oh's stall-breaking abilities with what is unarguably the single best wall in all of Pokémon would definitely be a worthwhile trade in this highly-offensive metagame, especially since Primal Groudon in this team to some extent possesses a decent amount of wall-breaking power anyway. Bringing back to life a relic that originated from my very first Rate My Team ever, I replaced Ho-Oh with one of my most famous signature Pokémon - The Great Pokémon Master's Supreme Ultimate Shield, more commonly known and referred to as the dual status Lugia.

    Aside from serving as an excellent check to both Mega Rayquaza as well as Return/Frustration Life Orb Extreme Killer Arceus, which can also rack up serious damage on the opponent's team with Whirlwind in combination with Stealth Rock, this Lugia can also support this team's other members by paralyzing Pokémon with Thunder Wave. Not only does this allow many threats to be outrun and KO'd by Primal Groudon, but it also saves this team's two SwagKeys from having to paralyze some Pokémon themselves. Firing a Thunder Wave with Klefki is inherently riskier than doing so with Lugia, due to the Key Ring Pokémon's far lesser bulk as well as its lack of instant recovery. By paralyzing a Pokémon with Lugia before Klefki comes into it, having the Steel/Fairy-type Pokémon shoot a Swagger at it reduces its chances of attacking on that turn down to a mere 33.75%, instead of a 55%, while at the same time allowing Klefki to immediately hide behind a Substitute on the next turn instead of having to use Thunder Wave and risking being attacked, possibly by a boosted physical hit.

    Besides that, Lugia also checks Ho-Oh, a Pokémon this team previously had some trouble with. And although Sacred Fire burns are always a pain for the Diving Pokémon, it is not such a big deal in this team since it has a Heal Bell user in Clefable.



    At this point, the team was judged by myself to be almost perfect, and the only thing it was missing was a name. Because this team is the resurrected form of In Luck We Trust, I decided to call it "In Luck We Trust II," but thought that simply naming the team that would be very unsatisfying. Tentatively, I decided to name this team "In Luck We Trust II [Resurrection By The Ace of Spades]" in reference to the luck and gambling-like nature of using SwagKey, as well as the old team which was revived through this team's creation. However, upon observing the nicknames of my team's members, I thought it would be more aesthetically pleasant to change the "Resurrection By The Ace of Spades" part of the team's name to Arabic, resulting in me ultimately giving my team the name In Luck We Trust II [إحْياء من الآس البستوني]. Credits to both DonnoTheFirst and Lord Outrage for translating the English text to Arabic for me.

    A closer look at the team:



    زكاة (Klefki) (M) @ Leftovers  
    Ability: Prankster  
    EVs: 240 HP / 240 SpD / 28 Spe  
    Calm Nature  
    IVs: 0 Atk  
    - Foul Play  
    - Substitute  
    - Swagger  
    - Thunder Wave  

    The two SwagKeys serve as the centerpieces of this team. As one of the most commonly-used Pokémon in the Anything Goes metagame, as well as a Pokémon which has already appeared in two of my past Rate My Team threads, its function as a sweeper with the dreaded SwagPlay strategy, as well as its potential to turn almost any losing battle around should be well-known to anyone who views this thread, so I will save people's time by not explaining all of that in detail, like I did in Probability-Defying Perfection and In Luck We Trust. I will, however, point out that SwagKey is particularly good at sweeping through multiple support or Calm Mind Arceus. And in the Anything Goes metagame, in which Magic Coat is very common on pretty much any type of Arceus, Substitute is also very useful for preventing Klefki's own Swagger and Thunder Wave from backfiring on itself.

    In addition to its sweeping potential, Klefki, with its extremely useful defensive type combination, also serves as an excellent check to Yveltal. And its access to Prankster Thunder Wave allows it to either act as an emergency check to many fast threats such as Darkrai, Mega Rayquaza and Geomancy Xerneas, if not even outright beat them with SwagPlay, given the right luck. It should also be mentioned that Substitute also serves the purpose of allowing Klefki to, in some situations, Toxic-stall Pokémon to death after they have been poisoned by either Lugia or Arceus-Water, an option which is sometimes safer than trying to overcome them with Swagger. And although repeatedly making multiple Substitutes to Toxic-stall out a Pokémon may potentially cost the Key Ring Pokémon more of its HP than if it went for the luck-based path with Swagger, this is often not too big of a deal anyway since Klefki's HP can be restored by Leftovers recovery as well as Clefable's Wish.

    Klefki's type combination makes it an overall better check to specially-offensive threats than physically-offensive threats, and this, combined with the fact that investing in Defense would be mostly meaningless anyway after the opponent's Pokémon's Attack has been boosted Swagger, has led to my decision to make the Steel/Fairy-type Pokémon specially-defensive, just like in both of the previous teams in which I have used this Pokémon. The specific HP and Special Defense EV numbers allow the Key Ring Pokémon to make five Substitutes in a row from full health, which can be very helpful especially if Klefki's Substitute is being used to Toxic-stall an opposing Pokémon to death. Credits for this EV spread go to Desch, who possesses a great deal of knowledge regarding EV optimization as well as many intricate aspects of this game's mechanics.



    الشهادة (Klefki) (F) @ Leftovers  
    Ability: Prankster  
    Shiny: Yes  
    EVs: 240 HP / 240 SpD / 28 Spe  
    Careful Nature  
    - Play Rough  
    - Substitute  
    - Swagger  
    - Thunder Wave  

    Operates under the exact same concept as the other Klefki, except I replaced Foul Play with Play Rough on this one in order to break Darkrai's Substitute in one hit, since Substitute Darkrai is otherwise an extremely threatening Pokémon to this team, especially if it gets past Clefable with a combination of long sleeps, Dark Pulse flinches and critical hits. The replacement of Foul Play with Play Rough on this Klefki makes it overall a less effective user of the SwagPlay strategy though, so this Klefki is generally more expendable than the other one if a death fodder is needed against a team that does not have a Darkrai (or after it has already fainted).



    صلاة (Clefable) (M) @ Leftovers  
    Ability: Unaware  
    EVs: 252 HP / 252 Def / 4 SpD  
    Bold Nature  
    IVs: 0 Atk  
    - Heal Bell  
    - Moonblast  
    - Protect  
    - Wish  

    In a metagame in which teams with multiple Lum Berry Extreme Killer Arceus are an incredibly common sight, the presence of a physically-defensive Unaware wall in a team whose primary strategy involves raising the opponent's Pokémon's Attack stat should be self-explanatory. While repeatedly healing itself with a combination of Wish and Protect, the Fairy Pokémon can slowly but surely wear down and eventually KO Extreme Killer Arceus with repeated Moonblasts. Wish also allows Clefable to quickly, in emergency situations, heal its teammates, especially the two Klefki, which lack methods of recovery other than with their Leftovers. In a defensively-oriented team such as this one, Heal Bell's value should also be obvious, being able to wake up Groudon after it uses Rest, and also cure any status effects which may be crippling the other four Pokémon, all of which greatly dislike being under status effects, especially burn in the case of the two Klefki and Toxic in the case of Lugia and Arceus-Water. Other functions of this Clefable include completely and utterly countering the inconsistent but nonetheless dangerous Moody Glalie, as well as stalling out Substitute Darkrai that lack Sludge Bomb and Taunt, provided they do not get too lucky with sleep turns, Dark Pulse flinches and critical hits, of course. Although, even such factors which may allow Darkrai to overcome Clefable become largely irrelevant if the opponent's Dark-type Pokémon happens to get paralyzed beforehand.



    حج (Groudon) @ Red Orb  
    Ability: Drought  
    Shiny: Yes  
    EVs: 200 HP / 252 SpD / 56 Spe  
    Careful Nature  
    - Lava Plume  
    - Precipice Blades  
    - Rest  
    - Stealth Rock  

    Primal Groudon is  In Luck We Trust II [إحْياء من الآس البستوني]'s Stealth Rock user as well as its primary check to all variants of Kyogre. Because full stall teams have always been the #1 enemy of the SwagPlay strategy, Primal Groudon's signature move Precipice Blades in combination with its burn-spreading Lava Plume attack, which also destroys some Steel-type Pokémon which Precipice Blades do not, such as Skarmory and Ferrothorn, are important in this team for pummeling stall teams to some extent. Lava Plume's decent burn chance can also be a life saver in some situations against physical sweepers such as Mega Rayquaza and Extreme Killer Arceus, especially if Clefable has fainted and/or Lugia has either fainted or cannot switch in safely due to Stealth Rock being down on In Luck We Trust II [إحْياء من الآس البستوني]'s side of the field, Multiscale being broken or both. And finally, because a user of this team ought to expect to fight an extremely long battle of attrition if the opponent happens to bring a stall team, Rest is needed to prolong the Continent Pokémon's longevity against such teams.

    Thanks to its Ground typing, Primal Groudon prevents this team from being swept by the relatively uncommon yet nonetheless still existent Zekrom, and the Ground/Fire-type Pokémon also prevents the quite common Calm Mind Arceus-Steel from performing a last-Pokémon sweep against this team, since Primal Groudon can outrun it after it has been paralyzed by Lugia or a Klefki, before knocking it out with Precipice Blades. The team's two Klefki can also use SwagPlay to prevent Calm Mind Arceus-Steel from sweeping when it is the opponent's last Pokémon, although they are obviously much more luck-dependent than Primal Groudon when it comes to performing that role.

    This Pokémon was given a large amount of Speed-creep since I find outrunning many bulky Primal Kyogre to be extremely important, while the rest of the EVs as well as its Nature are used to make it specially bulky so that it can tank Kyogre's attacks well. A Careful Nature is chosen over a Calm Nature as I think preserving Precipice Blades's power is more important than preserving that of Lava Plume, which is only used to hit a select few Pokémon and spread burns anyway.



    صيام (Lugia) @ Leftovers  
    Ability: Multiscale  
    EVs: 252 HP / 160 Def / 96 Spe  
    Bold Nature  
    IVs: 0 Atk  
    - Roost  
    - Thunder Wave  
    - Toxic  
    - Whirlwind  

    Ever since I made a Rate My Team thread dedicated to my very first Anything Goes team, TheAbsolutePower, Lugia has gradually been seen by many Anything Goes players as something akin to my signature Pokémon in that metagame, an idea which was only further strengthened by my decision to include this Pokémon in several other teams Anything Goes teams of mine, including In Luck We Trust II [إحْياء من الآس البستوني]. However, what many people may not realize is that this team features not merely my signature Pokémon in the Anything Goes metagame, but rather, one of my most famous inventions and trademark Pokémon movesets ever in the entire history of my Pokémon battling career - the dual status Lugia, or The Great Pokémon Master's Supreme Ultimate Shield, a moveset whose creation dates all the way back to 2011.

    This Lugia is In Luck We Trust II [إحْياء من الآس البستوني]'s primary Mega Rayquaza check, in addition to being a hard-counter to countless other Pokémon in the metagame, including pretty much any Swords Dance or Calm Mind Arceus that lack Magic Coat (especially Extreme Killer Arceus with Life Orb and Return/Frustration, which even Clefable cannot wall), Primal Groudon, Geomancy Xerneas that lack Ingrain, and far more. It has the option of either poisoning a Pokémon with Toxic before stalling it to death, or paralyzing fast and powerful offensive threats while letting either a combination of Stealth Rock and Whirlwind, or the team's other members faint them. By paralyzing the opponent's Pokémon, Lugia can also support this team's two SwagKeys, by saving them from having to spend a turn paralyzing threats themselves - a turn which could lead to them fainting or getting heavily damaged if they are unlucky. Alternatively, badly poisoning some bulkier Pokémon actually makes defeating them with SwagPlay easier than paralyzing them. Whirlwind allows the Psychic/Flying-type Pokémon to cancel out the stat boosts of opposing Pokémon, while at the same time possibly racking up Stealth Rock damage on their team, while Roost is for healing and reactivating Multiscale in order to allow Lugia to comfortably tank even the most powerful attacks the Anything Goes metagame has to offer.

    The EVs maximize Lugia's HP, while giving it enough Speed to outrun Pokémon with base 90 Speed provided they do not run a Speed-raising Nature, and the rest of the EVs are thrown into Defense alongside a Bold Nature, since the main offensive threats that Lugia needs to wall in this team, such as Mega Rayquaza, Extreme Killer Arceus and Primal Groudon, are physical attackers.



    الله (Arceus-Water) @ Splash Plate  
    Ability: Multitype  
    EVs: 252 HP / 156 Def / 100 Spe  
    Timid Nature  
    IVs: 0 Atk  
    - Defog  
    - Judgment  
    - Recover  
    - Toxic  

    The original In Luck We Trust's final member returns to this team, but with changes to its moveset and EV spread that make it play a considerably different role than before. A Splash Plate was once again chosen as this support Arceus's item for several reasons. Firstly, a Water typing allows this Pokémon to tank Primal Groudon's attacks while Toxic-stalling it and removing the Stealth Rock it sets up with Defog. Secondly, it allows Arceus to serve as a switch-in to any Primal Kyogre that switches directly into this team's Primal Groudon. And finally, Arceus-Water happens to be one of the support Arceus Formes capable of checking Mega Diancie, which otherwise completely walls and destroys this team. Defog is absolutely mandatory in In Luck We Trust II [إحْياء من الآس البستوني] not only for its ability to prevent Lugia from having its Multiscale nullified upon switching into Stealth Rock, but also because this team often finds itself in incredibly long battles involving a lot of switching, especially if it happens to face a stall team. Toxic is primarily for placing a time limit on the lives of opposing Primal Groudon, but it is also great for annoying pretty much any Pokémon that can be affected by it, most notably Lugia, Ho-Oh and opposing support Arceus. Judgment is just a general attack which can hit Mega Gengar if Arceus-Water happens to get trapped by it, and also serves as the team's most probable method of hitting Mega Diancie.

    The Speed EVs combined with a Timid Nature allow Arceus-Water to outrun the standard Mega Diancie set seen on Smogon analyses, while the rest of the EVs serve to maximize this Pokémon's physical bulk, due to how commonly it needs to tank Primal Groudon's insanely powerful Precipice Blades.

    Replays (note: this team's shiny Klefki may have Foul Play instead of Play Rough in some of these replays, as changing its Foul Play to Play Rough was one of the last changes I made to this team):

    VS. HunterStorm (an extremely skilled trainer)
    VS. HunterStorm (again)
    VS. HunterStorm (again)
    VS. thelinearcurve (an extremely skilled trainer)
    VS. DonnoTheFirst (a skilled trainer)
    VS. DanteZeraxVoorheez (a skilled trainer)
    VS. DanteZeraxVoorheez (again)
    VS. DanteZeraxVoorheez (again)
    VS. Megaqwer (a skilled trainer)
    VS. zjun (this SwagPlay team shows a team of six SwagKeys who is boss)
    VS. Lidist2 (who used TheAbsolutePower against me)
    VS. TeamFearless (who used this team made by Zangooser)
    VS. FischerChew (in a battle that is so unbelievably long that the replay did not even end. You can read the log of the full battle here)
    VS. notice me sarii
    VS. Sho Nyo Shi Dae
    VS. Synopticism
    VS. ihatejohncena
    VS. 0jir1saf
    VS. 0jir1saf (again)
    VS. 9td40o909
    VS. 9td40o909 (again)
    VS. vsafgdh
    VS. carlitos385
    VS. carlitos385 (again)
    VS. TenucSkenuck
    VS. ThunderRaikou22
    VS. Seductor Ninja
    VS. ogichi2205
    VS. ThekARTIKs

    Importable:

    Importable:
    زكاة (Klefki) (M) @ Leftovers  
    Ability: Prankster  
    EVs: 240 HP / 240 SpD / 28 Spe  
    Calm Nature  
    IVs: 0 Atk  
    - Foul Play  
    - Substitute  
    - Swagger  
    - Thunder Wave  

    الشهادة (Klefki) (F) @ Leftovers  
    Ability: Prankster  
    Shiny: Yes  
    EVs: 240 HP / 240 SpD / 28 Spe  
    Careful Nature  
    - Play Rough  
    - Substitute  
    - Swagger  
    - Thunder Wave  

    صلاة (Clefable) (M) @ Leftovers  
    Ability: Unaware  
    EVs: 252 HP / 252 Def / 4 SpD  
    Bold Nature  
    IVs: 0 Atk  
    - Heal Bell  
    - Moonblast  
    - Protect  
    - Wish  

    حج (Groudon) @ Red Orb  
    Ability: Drought  
    Shiny: Yes  
    EVs: 200 HP / 252 SpD / 56 Spe  
    Careful Nature  
    - Lava Plume  
    - Precipice Blades  
    - Rest  
    - Stealth Rock  

    صيام (Lugia) @ Leftovers  
    Ability: Multiscale  
    EVs: 252 HP / 160 Def / 96 Spe  
    Bold Nature  
    IVs: 0 Atk  
    - Roost  
    - Thunder Wave  
    - Toxic  
    - Whirlwind  

    الله (Arceus-Water) @ Splash Plate  
    Ability: Multitype  
    EVs: 252 HP / 156 Def / 100 Spe  
    Timid Nature  
    IVs: 0 Atk  
    - Defog  
    - Judgment  
    - Recover  
    - Toxic  

    Threat List:

    : All Extreme Killer Arceus except for those with Life Orb + Return or Frustration are countered by Clefable, while all of such Pokémon except for those with Magic Coat are also countered by Lugia. A Klefki behind a Substitute or an Arceus-Water against an unboosted Extreme Killer Arceus can also nullify an Arceus-Normal's Lum Berry with Thunder Wave or Toxic in order to give Lugia an easier time countering it.

    : Countered by Lugia as long as Stealth Rock is off In Luck We Trust II [إحْياء من الآس البستوني]'s side of the field. However, do note that Lugia cannot afford to switch into a Lum Berry Mega Rayquaza on the turn it Dragon Dances and then nullify its Lum Berry on the next turn while tanking a Multiscale-softened Dragon Ascent, as the next Dragon Ascent will deal about 60% damage to the Diving Pokémon, which would either result in it eventually fainting if it chooses to Roost repeatedly, or get knocked out by Extreme Speed if it chooses to use Thunder Wave again. As such, it is generally a wise decision to eliminate Mega Rayquaza's Lum Berry either in a situation in which it finds itself out against a full-health Lugia while unboosted (most likely after being dragged out by Whirlwind), or by hitting it with Arceus-Water's Toxic or a Klefki's Thunder Wave, even if it means sacrificing a Pokémon before sending Lugia out safely.

    Any variant of Mega Rayquaza lacking Lum Berry are far easier to deal with, as Lugia only needs a single Thunder Wave to cripple them. It should also be noted that Rayquaza's Stealth Rock weakness is extremely exploitable by this team. After Primal Groudon has set up Stealth Rock, this team often does not even need to bother inflicting any status effects on Mega Rayquaza, as Lugia can usually just drag the Sky High Pokémon in and out a few times until the Stealth Rock damage faints it.

    If Lugia has somehow been taken out, Mega Rayquaza can be beaten by SwagPlay with some luck, or if it happens to be poisoned, Clefable and the two Klefki can try to Toxic-stall it out with Wish + Protect and repeated Substitutes, respectively. In desperate situations, a weakened and paralyzed Mega Rayquaza can also be finished off by Foul Play, Play Rough or Moonblast.

    : Support variants of Primal Groudon are countered and have their Stealth Rock removed by Arceus-Water, while Swords Dance variants are countered by Lugia.

    : All Xerneas except for those with Ingrain are countered by Lugia, while pretty much all Xerneas are more often than not beaten by the two Klefki's SwagPlays. Primal Groudon also works wonder against the Life Pokémon, especially one that has been paralyzed.

    : In Luck We Trust II [إحْياء من الآس البستوني]'s shiny Klefki can avoid a Dark Void by setting up a Substitute, while breaking the Pitch-Black Pokémon's Substitute on the next turn with Play Rough, before crippling the Dark-type Pokémon on the next turn with Thunder Wave. A paralyzed Darkrai is also walled by Clefable unless it has Sludge Bomb, and this Pokémon in general is often beaten by SwagPlay.

    : As long as no entry hazards are on In Luck We Trust II [إحْياء من الآس البستوني]'s side of the field, SwagKey can do absolutely nothing against this team, as its user can simply switch repeatedly between the three Fairy-type Pokémon until the opponent's SwagKey either switches out or runs out of PP. Spikes Klefki cannot paralyze and are threatened by Primal Groudon, while their Spikes can be removed by Arceus-Water's Defog.

    : Swords Dance Arceus-Ghost is countered by Clefable, while Calm Mind and support Arceus-Ghost are more often than not beaten by SwagPlay. A full-health Lugia can also take a boosted hit from both Swords Dance and Calm Mind Arceus-Ghost before paralyzing it, and then Roosting to regain Multiscale repeatedly until a turn ends in which the Alpha Pokémon is fully paralyzed, after which the Diving Pokémon can eliminate its stat boosts with a simple Whirlwind. Arceus-Ghost also strongly dislikes being badly poisoned, though do watch out for Magic Coat from support variants.

    : Countered by Primal Groudon. If Primal Kyogre switches into Primal Groudon, switch to either Arceus-Water or Lugia depending on the situation, usually by asking yourself whether it is better to keep Lugia's Multiscale intact or keep the team's Defog user healthy, before switching back to Primal Groudon. If a non-Primal Kyogre comes into one of In Luck We Trust II [إحْياء من الآس البستوني]'s three Fairy-type Pokémon, try to scout Sheer Cold with Substitute or Protect. If Clefable does scout such a move, switch to Klefki and then hide behind a Substitute, since non-Primal Kyogre almost always hold Choice Scarf.

    : Countered by the two Klefki, which can often even use it as setup bait if it lacks Taunt. As most Yveltal have only Foul Play as their attack, they dislike dealing with Clefable and its Moonblast as well, and Arceus-Water's Toxic does it no favor.

    : Countered by Primal Groudon if it lacks Earth Power, and the ones which do have Earth Power are almost always Calm Mind sets, which are countered by Lugia. The two Klefki can also easily set up a Substitute against Arceus-Fairy lacking Earth Power.

    : Countered by Lugia unless it has Will-O-Wisp, in which case it will almost certainly lack Earth Power, and thus get countered by Primal Groudon. Calm Mind and Swords Dance Arceus-Steel are easily paralyzed by Lugia, and outrun and KO'd by Primal Groudon if it attempts a last-Pokémon sweep. Arceus-Steel can often be beaten by SwagPlay too.

    : Annoying in respect to its ability to disrupt the SwagPlay strategy with Whirlwind, but it cannot possibly hope to accomplish anything against In Luck We Trust II [إحْياء من الآس البستوني], as the two Klefki are immune to Toxic, Primal Groudon is immune to Thunder Wave, and the team has Heal Bell anyway. The Toxic of this team's Lugia and Arceus-Water greatly annoy it, as does Primal Groudon's Lava Plume.

    : Easily paralyzed and eliminated by Klefki, and Lugia can counter it as well if it lacks Taunt.

    : Toxic and Stealth Rock greatly annoy it. As much as Lugia hates being burned by Sacred Fire, it counters Ho-Oh as well, and Clefable can use Heal Bell to cure the Diving Pokémon of its burn anyway. Arceus-Water, with its great physical bulk, resistance to Sacred Fire and access to both Toxic as well as a Judgment with which it can hit the Rainbow Pokémon super effectively, can wall Ho-Oh to some extent as well. After Stealth Rock is down, the Fire/Flying-type Pokémon gets destroyed by SwagPlay if Klefki is behind a Substitute when it comes in.

    : If it transforms into Primal Groudon, it is countered by Arceus-Water and Lugia, while it is countered by Klefki if it transforms into Arceus-Water. Ditto is almost completely useless if it transforms into any other member of In Luck We Trust II [إحْياء من الآس البستوني].

    : Can be quite a threatening Pokémon to this team, due to its ability to easily trap and eliminate Clefable, as well as even Lugia if it has Taunt, and this is particularly debilitating if the opponent also has several Extreme Killer Arceus in their team. If Mega Gengar lacks Taunt, Lugia can paralyze it with Thunder Wave before pseudo-Hazing it away, at which point it will be far less threatening for the rest of the match. Although with that said, it can still easily trap and eliminate Clefable anyway, so one ought to be very careful about that. If the situation does arise in which Clefable and Lugia get eliminated by Mega Gengar, and the opponent has several Extreme Killer Arceus in their team, then unfortunately, one will have no choice but to try to get insanely lucky with SwagPlay in order to overcome all of the opponent's team, something which fortunately will almost never be insanely difficult, since Mega Gengar find themselves in hyper-offensive teams far more often than in stall teams. Other than that though, In Luck We Trust II [إحْياء من الآس البستوني]'s two Klefki, Primal Groudon and Arceus-Water can defeat Mega Gengar quite easily, though in the case of the last two, they may need to sacrifice themselves in the process due to the Ghost/Poison-type Pokémon's Destiny Bond.

    : An unbelievably annoying Pokémon for In Luck We Trust II [إحْياء من الآس البستوني] to face, especially if it happens to be the opponent's Defog user, since its Pressure Ability allows its Defog to outstall Primal Groudon's Stealth Rock. It is extremely difficult to overcome with SwagPlay, and it tanks Primal Groudon's attacks very well, while it does not mind being affected by Toxic or burns thanks to Rest. Clefable can KO physically-defensive Giratina-A with three Moonblasts, but with everything in mind... prepare for an extremely long stall battle if the opponent ever uses this Pokémon, and remember to take advantage of Primal Groudon's immunity to Will-O-Wisp as well as the two Klefki's immunity to Toxic.

    : Smeargle are almost always leads, so lead with the shiny Klefki against it. Its Spore and Nuzzle are blocked by Substitute, while the Key Ring Pokémon can assault it safely behind that Substitute with Play Rough. If Smeargle Baton Passes any stat boosts to another Pokémon, that Pokémon can be Thunder Waved, Swaggered or both by Klefki behind its Substitute, and the recipient of Smeargle's stat boosts can often be countered by Clefable, Lugia or both anyway. Any entry hazards Smeargle sets up can be removed later by Arceus-Water's Defog.

    : Can be hit hard by Arceus-Water and especially Primal Groudon, while the former can also use Defog to remove any entry hazards Skarmory sets up.

    : Deoxys-S are almost always leads, so anti-lead it with the team's normal-colored Klefki. Substitute prevents Deoxys-S from tricking something undesirable onto the Steel/Fairy-type Pokémon, while Klefki can destroy the DNA Pokémon with three Foul Plays, possibly combined with Swagger and Thunder Wave if Deoxys-S does not use Taunt on the first turn. Any entry hazards this Pokémon sets up can be removed by Arceus-Water later.

    : Regardless of what Mega Stone it may hold, or even if it does not hold a Mega Stone at all, Primal Groudon and Arceus-Water can both hit it hard, while the two Klefki's Prankster Thunder Waves can make life very difficult for it. Mewtwo can often be overcome with SwagPlay, and it even gets completely countered by Lugia if it lacks Taunt.

    : Dislikes being hit by Thunder Wave, Clefable can scout its move with Protect since this Pokémon almost always holds a Choice Scarf, and it generally cannot do much to Primal Groudon, Lugia or Arceus-Water.

    : Generally Toxic-stalled to death, beaten by SwagPlay, or a combination of the aforementioned. This team's Rest Primal Groudon also walls it.

    : Countered by Primal Groudon. Also, this team's normal-colored Klefki can use Substitute to block an attack from Aegislash while exposing its Blade form, and if it happens to neither switch out nor use King's Shield on the next turn, it can be KO'd by a single Foul Play.

    : Although the fact that it is pretty much impossible to beat with SwagPlay may be annoying, this Pokémon poses no threat to In Luck We Trust II [إحْياء من الآس البستوني], and Primal Groudon along with the two Klefki just wall it. Prepare for an extremely long battle if one happens to face this Pokémon though. In fact, such a battle would be unlikely to be over until long after the opponent's Clefable has used up all of its Aromatherapy or Heal Bell PPs.

    : Lead with the normal-colored Klefki against it. SwagPlay absolutely demolishes Scolipede, and if it Baton Passes any stat boosts to another Pokémon, that Pokémon will most likely experience the same fate as any potential recipient of stat boosts given to them by Smeargle, as explained in that Pokémon's section on this threat list. Any entry hazards Scolipede sets up can be removed by Arceus-Water later, and if the Alpha Pokémon gets poisoned by Toxic Spikes, that status effect can later be removed by Clefable's Heal Bell.

    : Countered by Arceus-Water, and Primal Groudon also beats it one-on-one, although it is definitely a huge threat to the rest of the team.

    : As far as its matchup against In Luck We Trust II [إحْياء من الآس البستوني] is concerned, Chansey is pretty much the same thing as Clefable, except it is even more annoying since Natural Cure prevents it from being worn down by burns and Toxic.

    : The main way to beat it is to badly poison it before walling it with either Arceus-Water or Lugia. If Mega Kangaskhan uses Power-Up Punch, it can either be walled by Clefable or have its Attack boosts eliminated by Lugia's Whirlwind. Unless one is extremely desperate and out of any options besides depending on pure luck to win, they should avoid using Swagger on a Mega Kangaskhan at all costs, even if the Klefki is behind a Substitute, as Parental Bond allows the Normal-type Pokémon to break the Steel/Fairy-type Pokémon's Substitute with the first hit of Earthquake, before dealing catastrophic damage against it with the second hit.

    : Mostly countered by Lugia and Arceus-Water, both of which being able to badly poison it, and the latter being able to hit it with a super effective Judgment. Although Arceus-Ground may be immune to Thunder Wave, Toxic combined with SwagPlay, especially if Klefki is already behind a Substitute at the time when Arceus-Ground comes in, still often beats it. Swords Dance Arceus-Ground that lack Recover also lose to Clefable.


    Last edited by Immanent God LANCE on Thu 31 Mar - 15:55; edited 4 times in total


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    Lord Itachi
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    Re: In Luck We Trust II [إحْياء من الآس البستوني] (Anything Goes, peaked at #1, 1977 points, 71-6 win-loss record)

    Post by Lord Itachi on Sun 27 Mar - 21:53

    Awesome RMT. Finally, read it till the end.


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    Desch
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    Re: In Luck We Trust II [إحْياء من الآس البستوني] (Anything Goes, peaked at #1, 1977 points, 71-6 win-loss record)

    Post by Desch on Sun 10 Apr - 2:02

    I feel like I have to give this team even more credit than I already have, and that in form of a small rate. The original team that was playable in the XY Übers was one of my favourite teams ever and I am glad to see its resurrection in the new Anything Goes meta. One of the reasons I really liked the team was because its playstyle paralleled competitive Pokémon battling, or as you referred to it "glorified gambling". I am really glad that I was able to contribute to this team in the way I could, and I hope to do so in the future as well!

    Now onto the rate itself. I must say that the defensive core in this team is absolutely amazing, and is one with a lot of potential. Clefable, Primal Groudon, Lugia and Arceus-Water has incredible synergy and is very tough to break through for even the most aggressive teams. Acreus-Water counterleads Deoxys-Attack, Primal Groudon and a lot of the supportive Arceus-Formes as well as lesser threats such as Shuckle and Forretress, preventing Stealth Rocks to be placed on your field to make it very much easier for Lugia to handle everything it needs to. I feel like your Arceus-Water and Primal Groudon should not be replaced or changed moves or EVs, as they are really effective the way they are in this team, as well as the variations you could pull off with this team. Lugia, your main answer to most physical attackers is much the same, although using something like Substitute or Reflect instead of Thunder Wave can also work, depending on the variations of the the team you use, which also applies to Clefable, whom can use both the physically defensive spread and specially defensive spread. However, in this version, your current movesets and spreads are optimal because of your two Klefkies who check Xerneas and Yveltal for you, meaning Clefable can go physical and Lugia wants to have Thunder Wave to help spread status.

    The Klefkies is you addition to the team and what the team was originally based off. It has now given birth to the best core I've seen in Anything Goes. Their spreads are perfect and is a huge threat to other teams with their status inducing moves as well as their sheer offensive presence from the combination of Swagger, Thunder Wave and Foul Play. Now, the main thing I want to bring up here, is that despite them being the original starting point of your team, the two Klefki'es roles and slots can be changed and still be as threatning as before, despite it removing the fun SwagPlay in the process, most of the time. I changed one of them into a Ditto and made the other one more supportive with Spikes to great success, as well as making Clefable physically defensive and giving Lugia Substitute to pressure opponents with entry hazards easier. This is only one of the countless, creative ways your core allow you to change up your team without making it less effective. Lum Berry/Life Orb/Choice Band Mega Rayquaza, Mega Gengar, Ho-Oh, Primal Kyogre, E-Killer are just other examples on ways for you to mix up your team to make it more useful against certain playstyles, i.e. stall and Baton Pass which are dangerous team to face with your current team.

    All in all this is a fantastic team, both to use and aesthetically. And the fact that it has a degree of variation, unlike a lot of other teams out there makes it even more interesting. The core I first talked about could also possibly be used in Übers to similar success, although without the use of SwagPlay. It truly shows how versatile this team is and how much potential it has.

    On a final note, I think the best spread for a Clefable at this point is one with only 10 Spe IVs, instead of 31 or 0 as I previously thought was optimal. This allows it to out-slow other status users such as 31 Spe IV Chansey and Blissey, get reduced damage from Ferrothorn's, Forretress' and Aegislash's Gyro Balls, as well as outspeeding paralysed Darkrai, +1 Speed Mega Rayquaza, +2 Speed Xerneas with up to 140 Speed EVs, which could be useful in some scenarios.


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    Re: In Luck We Trust II [إحْياء من الآس البستوني] (Anything Goes, peaked at #1, 1977 points, 71-6 win-loss record)

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