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    In Luck We Trust (XY Ubers)

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    Immanent God LANCE
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    Age : 26
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    In Luck We Trust (XY Ubers)

    Post by Immanent God LANCE on Mon 16 Jun - 15:15

    In Luck We Trust



    'Sup fellow trainers
    or should I say haters?
    I'm Pokémon Trainer R
    better than you ever are
    Greatest Pokémon Master in the universe
    peaked more ladders than you can observe
    when you face me while ladderin'
    my Klefki be Swaggerin'
    crushin' yer 'mons with confusion and Foul Play
    like I've just drawn the Ace of Spades!
    You thought you had it facing Probability-Defying Perfection?
    Now you have to face TWICE the frustration!
    Meet Klefki's partner Thundurus
    SwagPlay ain't failin' just 'cause of the Earthquake of your Landorus
    so you better concentrate and not start to steam
    and know not even EKiller can stop this team
    'cause Clefable ain't aware of the boosts behind its 'Dance
    'cause I'm CHAMPION LANCE!
    But either way I know you'll be cursin' me
    thinkin' how one who plays the game like this came to be
    but I hardly care 'cause I'm a Pokémon trainer
    AKA gambler
    In Luck We Trust is my philosophy
    there ain't no "competitive" Pokémon, that's just your sophistry
    it's always been this way
    even back in the GSC days
    them fools may have walled my Mewtwo and Cursegia
    but let's see their Bliss' n' 'Lax eat my 'Stoise's Fissure
    those motherfuckers thought I had no skills
    relyin' on 30% to secure my kills
    yet when they be outguessin' and counter-teamin'
    they think that's real skill but they be dreamin'
    Blah blah blah, fuck those moaners
    'cause no matter what they said I just beat 'em with my Luckpwner
    'cause I'm the Master of DaUniverse
    my Horn Drill killed many Snorlax even after six Curses
    I wish you were around for me t' drill holes in you
    with my motherfuckin' Kazeryuu
    I never gave a damn about stigmas and stupid rules
    NetBattle and Smogon and PO are just a bunch of dumb fools
    but I'm a God, far beyond their control
    I even used Quick Claw Ho-Oh, that's how I roll
    I once 6-0'd in six turns with FishTauros and I'm proud of it
    I'll gladly sweep you now with my swag 'til you ragequit
    before my parafusion you won't be able to even move
    and now you may say to me, "what skill does this prove?"
    but I ain't interested in what you think of me, bro
    'cause I'm just here to enjoy the game, yo
    I don't seek recognition and all that
    I just play to feel the pleasures of combat!
    Not that I care but I already have fame
    even back when I was ACCLAIM
    so I don't give a fuck
    you complain 'bout luck
    in a game of crits and and Scald burns and hax?
    That's just retarded to the max!
    Now drown in my SwagPlay
    pray for better luck on your next day
    'cause I'm the best, the Ultimate Champion
    the Fissurin', Horn Drillin' Dragon Champion
    1337 Champion
    AKA Transcendent God Champion
    So In Luck We Trust
    'cause as Pokémon trainers we inevitably must!

    Here it is, In Luck We Trust. My first XY Ubers and second Generation VI Rate My Team thread, as well  as my final present to the people of the Dragon Masters clan collectively before this clan splits on the 17th. It once again features SwagKey, and is once again made in honor of a team whose ability to be used is destroyed by the banishment of the SwagPlay strategy, in the Übers tier in this case, something which has already happened on Pokémon Online, and is more than likely about to happen on Pokémon Showdown!. Although it is hardly the very first XY Ubers team I ever built, my first Rate My Team thread for this generation will nonetheless be dedicated to this team due to the aforementioned reasons.

    Unlike the teams to which all of my previous Rate My Team threads were dedicated, I have never peaked a ladder with the latest version of In Luck We Trust as presented in this thread, mostly due to a loss of interest in playing XY Ubers shortly after making the latest version of this team. Nonetheless, two testaments to the strength of this team exists, the first being the fact that the latest version of this team was responsible for half of my victories in the highly prestigious and competitive (as far as this gambling game goes, anyway) Dragon Masters League Tournament which I won (the replays of those three matches will be posted in the "Replays" section of this thread), and the second being that, using several earlier versions of this team, I also managed to peak Pokémon Showdown!'s ubers ladder with 1668 points shortly after the Elo system was implemented upon the ladders of that simulator, as seen below:


    In any case, onto the team...

    The team at a glance:



    Team building process:

    My motivation to build this team first came upon fighting this battle, in which I saw how incredibly devastating my opponent's SwagKey was against me with just a bit of luck, being able to single-handedly take down two of my Pokémon while crippling two more with paralysis. Realizing that the only reason why I won that battle despite being placed in such a hugely disadvantageous position by my opponent's Klefki alone at the very start was because of how poorly-built the rest of my opponent's team was, I instantly realized at that moment that as a Pokémon moveset, SwagKey was no joke. Because it was still early on in the XY Ubers metagame at the time when that battle took place, I was eager to try all sorts of different strategies, in search of the best team possible for that metagame, so that I can continue to stand as the greatest Übers player of all time, as I have long established myself to be in previous generations. As a Pokémon trainer, I believe  that Pokémon Mastery is not something that can be achieved by anyone, since the vast majority of trainers who achieve success in a Pokémon metagame owes their success to their use of teams or strategies that place them at an advantageous position relative to a specific phase of the ever-changing cycle of the metagame, and as such, for most people, success in Pokémon is fleeting, mundane, unspectacular, and ultimately, far from the concept of Pokémon Mastery itself. I believe that "Pokémon Mastery" is synonymous not to temporarily standing in a position such that one wields a team that has the advantage against the rest of the metagame at a specific phase of its lifespan, but rather, to transcending the ever-changing cycle of the metagame itself - to escape the "infinite loop" embodied by the ever-changing cycle of the metagame, and find a power that is timelessly and perpertually effective in the metagame. For more information about the aforementioned principle, read this post of mine.

    Because of how incredibly frowned upon the use of SwagPlay was from my observation, which leads to few people daring to use it in fear of being persecuted, combined with how incredibly effective it was, as I witnessed in the battle I linked to before, I, at the time, believed that in the Generation VI Übers metagame, SwagPlay may have been that very "transcendent power" that was the key to Pokémon Mastery, in the same way that one-hit KO moves were such in Generation II back in the Pokémon NetBattle days, and the Groudon/Espeon/Ho-Oh combo was such in the Übers metagame of Generation V. Even irrespective of Swagger's recent banishment from the XY Ubers tier of Pokémon Online as well as its impending banishment from that tier on Pokémon Showdown!, I no longer hold the belief that SwagPlay embodies such transcendent power, mostly due to how much trouble it has against stall, probably the most powerful team archetype in the XY Ubers metagame, but as I did not know as much at the time, my aforementioned incorrect belief, combined with the fact that I, for some reasons, have a natural attachment to the use of strategies that are frowned upon, ultimately served as my greatest motivation to build In Luck We Trust, and so I started building the team with what I consider to be the two most effective SwagPlayers in the game: Klefki, and Thundurus-I. I thought that using at least two SwagPlayers in the team was optimal, since against offensive teams with enough pressure to prevent a SwagPlayer from setting up a free Substitute without luck involved, one can simply Swagger a Pokémon with one SwagPlayer when it's not behind a Substitute, and if it happens to get KO'd on that turn, the second SwagPlayer can come in and either set up a Substitute or reduce the opponent's Pokémon's chance of attacking even more by using Thunder Wave and then setting up a Substitute, before beginning the SwagPlay cycle to sweep large portions of the opponent's remaining team.



    After adding the two SwagPlayers into the team, I thought about what weaknesses they had, and the first that I thought of was Pokémon immune to Thunder Wave, since they have a significantly higher chance of overcoming the SwagPlayers, especially if they have Lum Berry. Seeing that the common Pokémon in Übers that are immune to Thunder Wave are Groudon, Landorus-T, Hippowdon and Zekrom, I saw this as the perfect chance to add my single favorite Über Pokémon to this team: Kyurem-W, opting for its Choice Specs set due to remembering how incredibly helpful this moveset has been for me in the Übers metagame of Generation V.



    As I needed a check to Extreme Killer Arceus as well as a Pokémon capable of setting up Stealth Rock, I then chose to add my good ol' reliable Groudon to this team, especially since the harsh sunlight it summons helps Kyurem-W a bit too, by powering up its Fusion Flare.



    With two Prankster Thunder Wave users, a Water-resistant Pokémon in Kyurem-W and Groudon's Drought, I believed that I could get away with using merely a soft check for Kyogre in this team, and thus opted for Arceus-Water, making it also serve as this team's Defog user as well as a soft Ho-Oh and Palkia check for compression purposes.



    With all the relevant threats in the metagame off the top of my head covered, I did not think much about what to add as the team's final member at first, so seeing as the team did not yet contain a Mega Evolution, I just went with a Mewtwonite X-equipped Mewtwo, as I thought it was an amazing Pokémon after having used it extensively in another team known as Kingdom of Energy, being able to KO support Dialga, Arceus-Rock, Arceus-Normal and Ferrothorn in a single hit with Low Kick. More specifically, I believed that the presence of a physically-defensive Groudon alone in a team is generally insufficient for checking Extreme Killer Arceus, so I thought that ensuring that the Alpha Pokémon cannot set up against half of this team (due to the threats of Low Kick and Will-O-Wisp from Mega Mewtwo X and Arceus-Water respectively) would be necessary to help deter that unbelievably dangerous offensive threat.



    Even so, I found that the team was not prepared enough against Arceus-Normal to be able to win consistently, especially considering how easily a Lum Berry Arceus can make this team's primary strategy, SwagPlay, backfire, making this Pokémon far more dangerous to this team than against a regular Übers team. So seeing as Mega Mewtwo X was not contributing as much to the team as I would have liked, I replaced it with a surefire counter to Extreme Killer Arceus: Unaware Quagsire, which I believed to be necessary for a SwagPlay team due to this strategy's inherently huge weakness to Extreme Killer Arceus. I also replaced Groudon's physically-defensive set with a fast, max. Attack Earth Plate set in order to replace Mega Mewtwo X's previous role of knocking out support Dialga before it gets the chance to attack, since Groudon no longer needed its physical bulk since the team now has Unaware Quagsire to completely and utterly counter Arceus-Normal anyway.



    The team was quite good so far, allowing me to reach #1 on Pokémon Showdown!'s Ubers ladder with 1668 points shortly after the Elo system was implemented onto that simulator's ladders. At this point, I also finally came up with the name of the team, In Luck We Trust, based on one of my central beliefs about "competitive" Pokémon according to which it is just a gambling game, the SwagPlay-centric theme of this team, as well as a certain Bleach chapter title, known as "In Sane We Trust".

    But at the time, I noticed many other SwagPlay teams used on the Pokémon Online server, which utilized Ditto instead of Quagsire as their way of handling Extreme Killer Arceus. Wondering if Ditto could be more effective than Quagsire, I decided to test it myself in order to find out the answer.



    While testing Ditto, a realization finally struck me: The team was practically helpless against stall, so in response to that, I thought about how to fit Mega Gengar, the premier anti-stall Pokémon of the Übers metagame, into this team, opting for the Perish trapping set as it is by far the most powerful tool against stall. The Pokémon that I decided to replace was Kyurem-W, the one which I had deemed to be the least useful member of the team at that point, as I realized that with Will-O-Wisp Arceus-Water as well as Groudon, the team didn't need to KO Groudon, Landorus-T, Hippowdon and Zekrom (which almost always holds Choice Scarf anyway, further rendering Kyurem-W irrelevant against it) in one hit that badly anyway, and additionally, I also realized that the White Forme of the Boundary Pokémon in Generation VI Übers is, sadly, nothing more than a shell of its former self from the previous generation, due to the nerf in the power of many of its attacks along with the rise of many Pokémon in this metagame that easily beat it, such as Ho-Oh, Arceus-Rock, Arceus-Fairy and Arceus-Water, and the last of those along with Aegislash also make it much more difficult for Kyurem-W to just "Ice Beam everything with no prediction required," as it could do very easily in BW2 Ubers.

    Since the team was now quite helpless against Giratina-A now that Kyurem-W was replaced, I also decided to replace Groudon with a support Dialga for the team's Stealth Rock setter. Such a move also made sense, as the replacement of Kyurem-W with Gengar made the team more vulnerable to Choice Scarf Kyogre, so replacing Groudon with a Water-resistant Pokémon made up for that.



    Then I realized that I did not like Ditto at all, and the reason was very simple: Yes, Ditto can revenge-kill Arceus-Normal, but one cannot switch straight from a SwagPlayer into Ditto when fighting against an Extreme Killer Arceus, forcing me to sacrifice a Pokémon every time Arceus-Normal came into a SwagPlayer in order to get Ditto out, unless I was lucky and the opponent's Alpha Pokémon was not holding a Lum Berry. Also, the team had a large Ground weakness, and surprisingly for a SwagPlay team, it was not as successful against offense as it was before, while Mega Gengar did not actually help against stall as much as I would liked, since Roar Giratina-A, a staple in many stall teams, remained as a tremendous problem for this team. Realizing that the team became very iffy and inconsistent after these changes, I decided to reset it back to an earlier version.



    The large weakness to stall persisted... until two brilliant ideas struck me, the first being the replacement of Quagsire with a physically-defensive Clefable, an Unaware wall which can serve Quagsire's role of countering Extreme Killer Arceus while at the same time wielding a great weapon against stall: Heal Bell. And the second was the replacement of Kyurem-W with my good ol' trusty Life Orb Substitute Ho-Oh, a very powerful wall-breaker which can absorb burns (and my team had absolutely no way whatsoever of absorbing this status effect or removing it prior to the addition of Clefable and Ho-Oh) and contributes incredibly to the team's defensive synergy (which the team was extremely lacking in before) while at the same time working excellently with the rest of this team, as with the immense amount of paralysis spreading thanks to the team's two Prankster Thunder Wave users, Life Orb Ho-Oh can be brutally abusive in this team through the use of Substitute and Roost, allowing it to end a turn behind a Substitute by fishing for the 25% chance of the opponent's Pokémon being fully paralyzed.



    Finally, a while after assembling the above team, I also replaced Groudon's set to a specially-defensive set with Leftovers to help against Kyogre, as the team didn't really need to KO support Dialga that badly anyway, and I also decided to name the team's Arceus-Water "Allah" while assigning the other five members nicknames after the Five Pillars of Islam, just because I thought it would be aesthetically awesome to do so.

    A closer look at the team:



    Zakat (Klefki) (M) @ Leftovers
    Ability: Prankster
    EVs: 248 HP / 228 SDef / 32 Spd
    Calm Nature
    IVs: 0 Atk
    - Foul Play
    - Substitute
    - Swagger
    - Thunder Wave

    Though the Rate My Team thread dedicated to Probability-Defying Perfection predates this thread, In Luck We Trust was actually made before the aforementioned team, and In Luck We Trust is also the very team in which SwagKey's ascent to its status as one of my signature Pokémon in Generation VI began. As the star of this team, Klefki's premise here is simple: Send the Steel/Fairy-type Pokémon into a Pokémon which cannot threaten it much, preferably those which cannot even break its Substitute in one hit, such as Darkrai, Deoxys-A without Fire Punch, Yveltal without Taunt, support Arceus-Rock, support Arceus-Fairy and support Arceus-Grass, and with that free turn, either set up a Substitute if the opponent's Pokémon is one of those that cannot break Klefki's Substitute in one hit but can potentially cripple it with a status move such as Dark Void or Will-O-Wisp, or cripple the opponent's Pokémon with Swagger, before paralyzing them with Thunder Wave, and then setting up a Substitute. While hiding behind a Substitute, which it can easily find a free turn to do considering the opponent's Pokémon only has a 37.5% chance of attacking through the combination of confusion and paralysis, Klefki can then assault the opponent's Pokémon with its Foul Play, powered up by the Swagger it had previously casted on the opponent's Pokémon. And after defeating one of the opponent's Pokémon while having its Substitute intact, Klefki can then go on to destroy the very next Pokémon the opponent sends out, using the very same aforementioned strategy, and unless the opponent has a counter to SwagKey, then before one knows it, a very large portion, if not the entirety of the opponent's team is mercilessly swept away by the Key Ring Pokémon. Even if that does not occur, Klefki's rampage will more than likely leave a large portion of the opponent's team paralyzed, allowing the team's Life Orb Ho-Oh to clean up the remains of the opponent's team with ease.

    Alternatively to finding a free turn to set up with Klefki, one can, of course, also opt to turn Pokémon into even more of a gambling game than it already is, by casting a Swagger in the face of any Pokémon that may appear before Klefki, regardless of how threatening it is to the Steel/Fairy-type Pokémon, in hope that it hurts itself in confusion on that turn, before using Substitute and Thunder Wave while hoping the opponent's Pokémon will hurt itself in confusion and/or be fully paralyzed enough times to buy Klefki enough free turns to get its momentum going. However, such a method is only ever recommended as a last resort to turn a losing battle around, in a situation in which it is absolutely necessary, with there being no other method that could possibly give a higher chance of winning, as one obviously can never be consistently successful by relying on this method primarily. When using this Klefki moveset, despite how luck-reliant many people believe it to be, and how luck-reliant it can sometimes be in practice, if one intends to win consistently, one must always, at all times, weigh risk and reward before clicking the "Swagger" as opposed to switching out, by asking questions such as:


    • "How threatening is the opponent's Pokémon at +2 Attack to Klefki and my team in general?"
    • "Is my Klefki currently hiding behind a Substitute?"
    • "Is the opponent's Pokémon already paralyzed, meaning there is a higher probability that it won't attack after getting confused?"
    • "Can the opponent's Pokémon even have its chance of attacking reduced below 50% in the first place? Or is it one of those that are immune to Thunder Wave?"
    • "Do I need to conserve my Klefki, due to the observation of fast offensive threats such as Mewtwo, Darkrai and/or a possible Geomancy Xerneas remaining in my opponent's team, which may need to be checked by Klefki's Prankster Thunder Wave later on in the match?"
    • "Is it the case that I'm in a position in which I have almost no chance to win unless my Klefki uses Swagger against what is directly in front of it while hoping to get lucky with confusion?"

    It should also be noted that there is a limit to what Klefki can overcome with SwagPlay. Pokémon like Hippowdon, Poison Heal Gliscor, Leftovers Xerneas with Rest and Sleep Talk, Gastrodon, Chansey, Blissey, Sylveon and Clefable are almost, if not absolutely impossible to beat with SwagPlay, so be sure to take them out with the team's other members, usually Life Orb Ho-Oh, before trying to get past them with SwagPlay, otherwise Klefki will just run out of PPs before being able to achieve anything. Additionally, if the opponent does not have Stealth Rock on their field, they can easily switch between two Pokémon that take minimal damage from Foul Play, especially when combined with recovery from Leftovers and/or possibly Regenerator, in order to PP-stall Klefki out, so be sure to use the rest of In Luck We Trust, especially the Life Orb Ho-Oh, to destroy the opponent's bulky Pokémon and/or their Defog/Rapid Spin user before attempting to sweep with SwagPlay. Thankfully, one is unlikely to encounter such problems if the opponent is using a hyper-offensive team though, since almost all of such teams usually consist of Pokémon which all take significant damage from Foul Play. And in fact, with a bit of luck, this Klefki can even completely sweep a typical hyper-offensive team.

    As mentioned before, one of the beauties of using more than one SwagPlayer in a team is that in a situation in which one cannot buy themselves a free turn to set up a Substitute without using Swagger and hoping the opponent's Pokémon hurts itself in confusion, one SwagPlayer can fire a Swagger against the opponent's Pokémon while sacrificing itself, before the second SwagPlayer comes in and either uses Substitute or further reduces the opponent's chances of attacking with Thunder Wave. As such, Klefki's Swagger can be used to help its teammate Thundurus-I set up a Substitute before proceeding to sweep a team, and vice-versa, though having Thundurus-I fire the initial Swagger is usually the better choice, since Klefki can usually sweep far more effectively due to its significantly better defensive typing.

    Aside from the aforementioned, Klefki's Swagger and Thunder Wave can also be used for other nifty purposes, such as lowering the opponent's chances of attacking so a teammate has a good chance of being able to switch in safely in order to perform a required task, such as Clefable using Heal Bell or Arceus-Water using Defog. And of course, Klefki can also use its Thunder Wave not for the purpose of SwagPlaying, but for paralyzing a fast offensive threat like Mewtwo, Choice Scarf Kyogre or Geomancy Xerneas, allowing them to be much more easily dealt with by the rest of the team.

    The EVs and Nature serve to maximize Klefki's special bulk, as not only are the vast majority of Pokémon it tends to switch into directly and tries to set up against specially-offensive from my experience, but regardless of its physical bulk, it isn't going to be taking Earthquakes or Swagger-enhanced physical attacks well anyway. The 32 EVs placed in Speed are for the purpose of Speed-creeping opposing SwagKey, since being able to Swagger or Thunder Wave them or set up a Substitute first is of game-changing importance in a battle between two SwagKey.



    Salat (Clefable) (M) @ Leftovers
    Ability: Unaware
    EVs: 252 HP / 252 Def / 4 SDef
    Bold Nature
    IVs: 0 Atk
    - Heal Bell
    - Protect
    - Toxic
    - Wish

    All competent Übers teams need a reliable way of at least checking Extreme Killer Arceus, and for a SwagPlay team such as In Luck We Trust, which revolves around raising the opponent's Attack stat with Swagger, nothing short of a physically-defensive Unaware wall to hard-counter the Alpha Pokémon is acceptable, especially considering how often this Pokémon carries Lum Berry. Though Clefable's physical bulk may pale compared to that of Quagsire, it is still sturdy enough to only take 46.4% damage maximum from Life Orb Adamant Arceus-Normal's ExtremeSpeed. Clefable was chosen over Quagsire for one extremely important reason, that being its access to Heal Bell, something that boosts this team's effectiveness against stall teams incredibly, since such teams rely heavily on burns and Toxic to achieve victory. Heal Bell also prevents Klefki and Thundurus-I from being completely shut down as SwagPlayers if they happen to get burned somehow, while at the same time preventing opposing Stealth Rock users from wearing down Arceus-Water with Toxic, and ensures that any burn Groudon suffers does not end up being permanent. Toxic is for wearing down Arceus-Normal, the very Pokémon this Clefable exists to counter, and Wish and Protect are for recovery purposes. The former can also be used to heal a teammate if need be, and such a need will more than likely come sooner or later in a battle against a stall team, considering the general length of such battles, while the latter can be used for scouting purposes, especially against Pokémon that hold Choice items. Be very careful of Mega Gengar though, as Clefable is completely helpless against it if it gets trapped.



    Shahadah (Thundurus) (M) @ Leftovers
    Ability: Prankster
    EVs: 248 HP / 228 SDef / 32 Spd
    Calm Nature
    IVs: 0 Atk
    - Foul Play
    - Substitute
    - Swagger
    - Thunder Wave

    There really is nothing much to say here that hasn't already been said in Klefki's section, considering this team's Klefki and Thundurus-I both utilize the exact same moveset and operate under the exact same principles. However, it should be noted that, unless the opponent has a Ground-type Pokémon, Ferrothorn and/or a Scizor, Mega or not, or if Klefki is severely weakened compared to Thundurus-I, Thundurus-I is generally less valuable to this team than Klefki due to its generally inferior defensive typing, especially with the Stealth Rock weakness, in contrast with Klefki's resistance to this entry hazard. As such, unless one finds themselves in one of the few situations in which Thundurus-I is more valuable for the team than Klefki, one should generally choose to sacrifice Thundurus-I in a situation in which one of In Luck We Trust's two SwagPlayers must be sacrificed to achieve something, such as paralyzing a Mewtwo or serving as death fodder. And of course, one should also be aware of the fact that the Pokémon against which Thundurus-I can set up a free Substitute are different, and fewer in numbers too compared to Klefki.



    Haji (Groudon) @ Leftovers
    Ability: Drought
    EVs: 200 HP / 252 SDef / 56 Spd
    Careful Nature
    - Earthquake
    - Overheat
    - Stealth Rock
    - Stone Edge

    With only an Arceus-Water to somewhat check Kyogre, Palkia and Ho-Oh at once, it is evident that the Alpha Pokémon will sooner or later break under all of that pressure, which is why the specially-defensive Groudon has returned at my service once again. Not only do the 56 Speed EVs allow the Continent Pokémon to Speed-creep many Ho-Oh and KO them with Stone Edge before they can react, but its specially-defensive build allows it to easily switch into Palkia or even a Choice Specs Kyogre's Water Spout, something it may need to do if Arceus-Water is weakened. After switching Groudon into Palkia or Kyogre and therefore summoning the Sun, one switch the weakened Arceus-Water into Kyogre in the Sun in order to use Recover so it can check Kyogre later, or switch out to Ho-Oh against Palkia (or a Kyogre locked into Surf), before proceeding to threaten the opponent's team with the rainbow phoenix's extraordinary wall-breaking powers. Additionally, the presence of Groudon in In Luck We Trust also forces the opponent's Choice Scarf or Choice Specs Kyogre to play mindgames, since it prevents them from just mindlessly spamming Thunder while knowing that this team's Kyogre check is weak to that move. And with Wish support from Clefable, Groudon can sometimes even switch into a Choice Scarf Kyogre's Water Spout more than once per match without fainting. Earthquake and Stealth Rock are self-explanatory moves, and Overheat is for roasting Pokémon like Skarmory, Ferrothorn and Scizor, as these Pokémon can all, in their own ways, cause massive problems for the SwagPlay strategy, and additionally, preventing Groudon from being walled by those Pokémon goes a long way in increasing this team's effectiveness against stall, which, as a playstyle, is the natural enemy of SwagPlay teams. Groudon is also the very Pokémon in this team which makes Zekrom a manageable threat, as the Deep Black Pokémon can be highly dangerous against the rest of the team with just a bit of luck.



    Sawm (Ho-Oh) @ Life Orb
    Ability: Regenerator
    Shiny: Yes
    EVs: 208 HP / 252 Atk / 48 Spd
    Adamant Nature
    - Brave Bird
    - Roost
    - Sacred Fire
    - Substitute

    In the three Übers Rate My Team threads I have made so far, absolutely every single one of them has contained both Leftovers Groudon and Life Orb Ho-Oh, which would probably make one wonder by now whether or not I have a special attachment to these two Pokémon. And the answer is yes - I indeed do, just because these two Pokémon are so incredibly amazing and have such awesome synergy with each other, in addition to contributing in innumerable ways to any team they find themselves in together. Although the weather nerf combined with more importantly the huge rise in Arceus-Rock's usage ensures that Life Orb Ho-Oh will no longer be the same hot knife through butter that it was against pretty much 99% of all teams found in the Generation V Übers metagame, its wall-breaking power is still absolutely insane, especially for a Pokémon capable of performing a myriad of roles besides wall-breaking, as its two Life Orb-boosted Same Type Attack Bonus moves, even in the Sun's absence, are still unbelievably devastating against any team that does not contain one of the few Pokémon that can counter Ho-Oh, and this, combined with the Rainbow Pokémon's incredibly coveted burn immunity, makes it an awesome fit in In Luck We Trust, as it serves as a tremendously powerful weapon which can punch holes in stall teams and eliminate any Pokémon which makes sweeping with SwagPlay extremely difficult, if not impossible. However, the relationship between Ho-Oh and this team's two SwagPlayers is not only limited to such, as they actually benefit each other mutually, since with the immense amount of paralysis support provided by this team's Klefki and Thundurus-I, this Ho-Oh's ability to abuse the Substitute + Roost combination is taken to an entirely new level as it is able to exploit the free turns created by the opponent's Pokémon being fully paralyzed in order to hide behind a Substitute before proceeding to devastate large portions of the opponent's teams. Additionally, even regardless of Substitute or Roost, Life Orb Ho-Oh, being an incredibly hard-hitting and bulky Pokémon whose only weakness is its lack of Speed, naturally enjoys its position in a SwagPlay team due to how much benefit it reaps out of the immense amounts of its teammates' Prankster Thunder Wave spamming, and the paralysis support is especially useful for allowing Ho-Oh to outrun and dispose of Mewtwo and Geomancy Xerneas with one of its devastating attacks.

    The EVs and Nature are made to maximize Ho-Oh's destructive power while granting it incredible bulk with enough HP for its Substitutes to endure a Seismic Toss, alongside a large amount of Speed creep.



    Allah (Arceus-Water) @ Splash Plate
    Ability: Multitype
    EVs: 252 HP / 160 SDef / 96 Spd
    Timid Nature
    IVs: 0 Atk
    - Defog
    - Judgment
    - Recover
    - Will-O-Wisp

    The Alpha Pokémon, equipped with a Splash Plate, becomes an incredible support Pokémon capable of checking many highly dangerous threats including Kyogre, Palkia, Ho-Oh, Groudon, Rayquaza, Reshiram, Kyurem-W and Mega Kangaskhan, while at the same time providing In Luck We Trust with the near-mandatory Defog support, which is great for this team not only because it contains Stealth Rock-weak Pokémon in Thundurus-I and Ho-Oh, but also because having hazard control is extremely important for a team which must be prepared for fight incredibly long battles if it happens to face a stall team. Judgment is a self-explanatory move, being able to deal good damage to Ho-Oh provided the Sun is not shining while at the same time threatening common Stealth Rock users such as Groudon, Landorus-T and Hippowdon, while Will-O-Wisp, with a significantly increased accuracy in this generation, has a myriad of utility, allowing Arceus-Water to cripple many physical attackers and slowly wear down many Pokémon, especially users of entry hazards. It should also be mentioned that many bulky Pokémon with low Attack become significantly easier to overcome with SwagPlay once they get burned, as despite their newfound immunity to Thunder Wave, the residual damage from burn really adds up in contribution to said bulky Pokémon's demise, especially since they take pitiful damage from Foul Play and confusion anyway. Finally, Recover serves to greatly enhance Arceus-Water's longevity, something that is extremely important considering this Pokémon plays the extremely important roles of countering numerous top threats in this metagame as well as keeping entry hazards off the field, and having access to instant recovery in general is simply too good to pass up in this slow and stallish metagame.

    The EVs and Nature serve to allow Arceus-Water to outrun Mega Kangaskhan so it can burn the Parent Pokémon before it attacks, since the Mega form of Kangaskhan can be very threatening to this team otherwise, while 252 EVs are placed in HP to maximize this Pokémon's overall bulk, and the remaining EVs are placed in Special Defense, since this Pokémon is In Luck We Trust's switch-in to Kyogre, after all.

    Logs/Replay (Note: Groudon may have a different moveset in some of these logs/replays):

    VS. Sasha The Master - Search the following code using Vs. Recorder: PU2G-WWWW-WWW5-SH2V
    VS. Imma Fly - Search the following code using Vs. Recorder: 2P8G-WWWW-WWW5-UAV7
    VS. ZoroarkForever (Round 1 battle in the Dragon Masters League Tournament)
    VS. justinjiaxinghu (Another Round 1 battle in the Dragon Masters League Tournament)
    VS. Tesung (Round 2 battle in the Dragon Masters League Tournament)
    VS. Arsenal (mirror match)
    VS. Arsenal (who used another SwagPlay team)
    VS. Arsenal (again)
    VS. Arsenal (again)
    VS. Arsenal (again)
    VS. Arsenal (again)
    VS. Aaron
    VS. Rohit
    VS. Ascension
    VS. Ivy
    VS. Spiral Core
    VS. Spiral Core (again)
    VS. Spiral Core (again)
    VS. Spiral Core (again)
    VS. shrang
    VS. OpTic Gaga
    VS. Is-Keldeo
    VS. Teppei Kiyoshi
    VS. sukru72jr
    VS. Crimson Blaze
    VS. 立华奏

    Importable:

    Spoiler:
    Zakat (Klefki) (M) @ Leftovers
    Ability: Prankster
    EVs: 248 HP / 228 SDef / 32 Spd
    Calm Nature
    IVs: 0 Atk
    - Foul Play
    - Substitute
    - Swagger
    - Thunder Wave

    Salat (Clefable) (M) @ Leftovers
    Ability: Unaware
    EVs: 252 HP / 252 Def / 4 SDef
    Bold Nature
    IVs: 0 Atk
    - Heal Bell
    - Protect
    - Toxic
    - Wish

    Shahadah (Thundurus) (M) @ Leftovers
    Ability: Prankster
    EVs: 248 HP / 228 SDef / 32 Spd
    Calm Nature
    IVs: 0 Atk
    - Foul Play
    - Substitute
    - Swagger
    - Thunder Wave

    Haji (Groudon) @ Leftovers
    Ability: Drought
    EVs: 200 HP / 252 SDef / 56 Spd
    Careful Nature
    - Earthquake
    - Overheat
    - Stealth Rock
    - Stone Edge

    Sawm (Ho-Oh) @ Life Orb
    Ability: Regenerator
    Shiny: Yes
    EVs: 208 HP / 252 Atk / 48 Spd
    Adamant Nature
    - Brave Bird
    - Roost
    - Sacred Fire
    - Substitute

    Allah (Arceus-Water) @ Splash Plate
    Ability: Multitype
    EVs: 252 HP / 160 SDef / 96 Spd
    Timid Nature
    IVs: 0 Atk
    - Defog
    - Judgment
    - Recover
    - Will-O-Wisp


    Last edited by Immanent God LANCE on Tue 29 Sep - 8:02; edited 4 times in total
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    Immanent God LANCE
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    Re: In Luck We Trust (XY Ubers)

    Post by Immanent God LANCE on Mon 16 Jun - 15:19

    Threat List:

    : Not only can Geomancy Xerneas easily be paralyzed by one of this team's two Pranksters, but Klefki can switch into Xerneas on the Geomancy and often beat it one-on-one with Swagger followed by Thunder Wave, Substitute, and then repeated Foul Plays in combination with confusion damage. Even if Klefki fails to beat it, Ho-Oh and Groudon can easily pick off a paralyzed Xerneas with their powerful physical attacks. Non-Geomancy offensive Xerneas are in the same boat as those that utilize Geomancy, though they are generally easier to deal with since Arceus-Water walls them and can burn-stall them, though one should definitely watch out for any Rock Slides aimed at Ho-Oh. As for defensive Xerneas with Leftovers, Aromatherapy, Moonblast, Rest and Sleep Talk, they can be a pain as they are extremely difficult to overcome with SwagPlay, especially if they are combined with another Pokémon that takes little damage from Foul Play, which will often be the case since such Xerneas usually find themselves in stall teams. And not only that, but their ability to instantly negate all of In Luck We Trust's efforts in spreading status using a simple Aromatherapy can be infuriating as well. The good thing though, is that such Xerneas are setup bait for this team's Substitute Ho-Oh, a Pokémon which can heavily damage many stall teams with its incredible power.

    : Extreme Killer Arceus is completely and utterly countered and Toxic-stalled to death by Clefable. The support sets are walled by Ho-Oh.

    : Unless Kyogre comes into Klefki or Thundurus-I behind a Substitute, in which case one should simply try to overcome the Sea Basin Pokémon with SwagPlay, Arceus-Water is the initial switch-in to Kyogre, as this move is relatively safe since Team Preview displays no information about Arceus's type. However, after Arceus-Water's type has been revealed to the opponent, Groudon should be switched into any predicted Thunders, a move that is of minimal risk due to the Continent Pokémon's specially-defensive build anyway. If Arceus-Water is not healthy enough to switch into Kyogre, Groudon can switched into the Water-type Pokémon and summon the Sun, before immediately switching back out to Arceus-Water to Recover, or even gain momentum by switching to Ho-Oh if a Choice Scarf Kyogre happens to lock itself into Surf. Another strategy for dealing with Kyogre involves forcing it to eat a Brave Bird from Ho-Oh, either on the turn they switch into Ho-Oh predicting a Sacred Fire, or by having Ho-Oh set up a Substitute against a different Pokémon before knocking out that Pokémon (which isn't hard to achieve with the immense amount of paralysis support this team has to offer), and then forcing Kyogre to come in to break its Substitute. With a high enough damage roll, a Life Orb Brave Bird can KO a 4 HP and 0 Defense Kyogre in a single hit, which is always very helpful. Other ways to deal with Kyogre include paralyzing it with a Prankster before outrunning and smashing it with Ho-Oh, and of course, if all else fails, one can always use Swagger and hope to get lucky...

    : A very threatening Pokémon. Regardless of what item it is holding, the main way to beat it is to paralyze it with a Prankster Pokémon before outrunning it and knocking it out with Ho-Oh's Brave Bird or Sun-boosted Sacred Fire if possible. If a Mewtwo comes into a healthy Ho-Oh, then it is usually a Mega Mewtwo X aiming to fell the Fire/Flying-type Pokémon with Rock Slide, so switch to Klefki in such a situation - even if the opponent turns out to have a Mega Mewtwo Y, Klefki resists the Psystrike anyway. If a Mewtwo comes into Arceus-Water, it is best to stay in and use Judgment in order to scout the opponent's Mega Mewtwo form first before reacting accordingly. Also, it should be noted that a healthy Ho-Oh can tank a Psystrike from a Mega Mewtwo Y before retaliating with a Sacred Fire, achieving a KO if it is either sunny or if the Sacred Fire happens to burn. Brave Bird KOs Mega Mewtwo Y in one hit regardless, but after taking a Psystrike, Ho-Oh will end up knocking itself out with the recoil. Also, this team's Groudon can take any hit from any Mewtwo form and deal some damage to it with Earthquake if need be, and if all else fails, one can always use Swagger and hope to get lucky, or just begin the SwagPlay cycle and have a Prankster behind a Substitute before Mewtwo comes in so that there is a huge chance that it just gets obliterated by SwagPlay anyway.

    : Arceus-Water is the initial switch-in, due to its resistance to Sacred Fire, access to recovery, and ability to threaten Ho-Oh reasonably well with its Judgment. In Luck We Trust's Speed-creeping Ho-Oh and Groudon can also outrun most opposing Ho-Oh and deal massive damage to or KO them with Brave Bird or Stone Edge respectively. Choice Band Ho-Oh also need to predict between Ho-Oh/Arceus-Water and Klefki/Thundurus when selecting its move, and its situation is made further worse for it due to Clefable's ability to scout its move with Protect. If worst comes to worst, the team will always stand a chance against the rainbow phoenix anyway due to Swagger.

    : Arceus-Water is the initial switch-in, being able to take the Spatial Pokémon's attacks well with its specially-defensive build, and attempt to burn-stall it. A Clefable that switches into a Dragon-type move can also Toxic-stall the Water/Dragon-type Pokémon, and Ho-Oh deals with Palkia well in the Sun. Another strategy that works against Palkia is paralyzing it to ensure that after just a bit of prior damage, Ho-Oh can outrun it and KO it with a single Brave Bird. If Palkia is not lucky, it can also be easily crushed by SwagPlay.

    : Countered and has its Stealth Rock removed by Arceus-Water.

    : More or less countered by Klefki, which can even use it as setup bait and begin the SwagPlay cycle if the Destruction Pokémon happens to not know Taunt. Arceus-Water also counters Yveltal and can burn it, and Ho-Oh can do the same to any Yveltal that does not know Foul Play or Rock Slide, or even a Yveltal that knows Foul Play but is burned.

    : Groudon deals with it well, and Zekrom additionally also often needs to predict between Klefki/Clefable and Groudon, since almost all of them holds Choice Scarf. The Dragon/Electric-type Pokémon is also very prone to being burned by Ho-Oh or Arceus-Water on the switch.

    : Unless it knows Fire Punch, Klefki sets up a Substitute in its face and either KOs it with two Foul Plays taking Focus Sash into account if it has Taunt, or even begins the SwagPlay cycle against it otherwise, which can be devastating as Deoxys-A almost always find themselves in hyper-offensive teams, meaning they cannot just switch around and try to PP-stall Klefki out like a stall or balanced team often can. If Deoxys-A has Fire Punch but lacks Taunt, Arceus-Water can burn it before proceeding to Defog repeatedly to ensure Deoxys-A can never leave the battle with Stealth Rock on its opponent's side of the field. In any case, absolutely every single Pokémon in this team can KO Deoxys-A instantly once it is paralyzed and its Focus Sash has been broken, even if it means sacrificing a Prankster Pokémon to achieve such a purpose.

    : When Gengar first comes into Clefable or Arceus-Water, the first Pokémon to switch to should be Klefki, which can take Mega Gengar's special attacks very well with its great special bulk, and then it threatens Mega Gengar a lot with priority Thunder Wave, Swagger, and Foul Play, all of which Mega Gengar greatly dislikes. It should be noted that once Klefki has switched into Mega Gengar, the Ghost/Poison-type Pokémon is unlikely to stay in due to how detrimental it would be for it to get crippled by Thunder Wave, so if the opponent has an Electric or Ground-type Pokémon in their team, use Swagger first (there is less risk to using this move compared to Substitute, since Mega Gengar almost always carries Taunt, which would spell trouble if it happens to stay in and use it for some reasons after Klefki has used Substitute). Once Gengar has already Mega Evolved, it can trap Groudon or Ho-Oh and sacrifice itself in order to take them down with Destiny Bond at best, though Ho-Oh can actually try to survive by playing mindgames with Mega Gengar using Substitute and Roost, and trying to KO the Shadow Pokémon on the turn it uses Taunt. Mega Gengar would not want to come into Klefki or Thundurus-I due to the threat of Prankster Thunder Wave, so the only Pokémon that Mega Gengar can easily trap and eliminate are Arceus-Water and especially Clefable, so play and read the opponent very carefully once they have a Gengar that has already Mega Evolved, and do not recklessly switch them into any Pokémon they are supposed to counter, as the opponent double-switching to Mega Gengar in such a situation will always exist.

    : Mega or not, Blaziken, cannot set up on anything except for Clefable, and the two Thunder Wave-using Pranksters just make it impossible for Blaziken to actually sweep In Luck We Trust.

    : Countered by Ho-Oh unless it chooses to blow itself up. Additionally, the ability of Clefable, Klefki and Thundurus-I to scout its move with Protect, Prankster Substitute and Prankster Substitute respectively, combined with the presence of Groudon, Arceus-Water and two Pokémon with Prankster Thunder Wave just makes life incredibly difficult for it.

    : The only time it is even remotely a threat to this team is if it transforms into Ho-Oh, which, holding a Choice Scarf, can be easily countered by Arceus-Water. Additionally, Ditto will also have a hard time actually transforming into anything in the first place, considering half of In Luck We Trust's members know Substitute.

    : Mega or not, it is countered by Ho-Oh, though due to Knock Off, this may come at the price of the Fire/Flying-type Pokémon's Life Orb. Arceus-Water also walls it and can burn it, though Scizor using U-turn as the Alpha Pokémon switches in can be very annoying. Groudon also takes all of its attacks well and destroys it with a single Overheat. It should also be mentioned that one should weigh risk and reward before using Swagger against Scizor, especially with Klefki and it is not behind a Substitute, as the Pincer Pokémon can make Swagger backfire with Bullet Punch if it gets lucky enough.

    : Its Swords Dance set is walled by Clefable, while its Calm Mind and support sets gets destroyed by both SwagPlay and Ho-Oh.

    : Can be quite annoying due to its ability to break SwagPlay cycles using Whirlwind, but with it constantly being threatened with burn or poison from Ho-Oh's Sacred Fire, Arceus-Water's Will-O-Wisp and Clefable's Toxic, combined with Klefki's immunity to Toxic as well as Clefable's ability to use Heal Bell to remove all status effects Lugia may spread, the Diving Pokémon is not really a problem for In Luck We Trust, though it will naturally make battles longer than otherwise.

    : When one sees a Darkrai in Team Preview, the best Pokémon to lead with is Klefki, as Darkrai have a tendency to be leads. As Darkrai generally lack a way to break Klefki's Substitute in one hit with any move barring the highly inaccurate Focus Blast, and also have a tendency to use Dark Void first-turn against Klefki, the Key Ring Pokémon can easily set up a Substitute in Darkrai's face, before proceeding to begin the SwagPlay cycle, which should be devastating for the opponent's team since Darkrai generally find themselves in extremely offensive teams, which lack Pokémon such as Clefable and Chansey which can easily counter SwagPlay. If Darkrai does happen to get the chance to put something to sleep, just sleep fodder the least useful Pokémon at the time. After that, Klefki can easily switch into it to paralyze it or turn it into setup fodder, and Ho-Oh can also come in to beat it as well. After Darkrai has been taken out, the victim of Dark Void can always be woken up with Clefable's Heal Bell later on if need be.

    : Arceus-Water can usually anti-lead Dialga leads, by burning and stalling it while using Defog to remove any Stealth Rock it sets. If Dialga uses Toxic, one can switch to Ho-Oh to quickly take it out, before removing Stealth Rock with Arceus-Water later. Choiced Dialga are easily countered by Ho-Oh or Arceus-Water, and are also generally not very effective against In Luck We Trust due to the presence of two Fairy-type Pokémon, combined with the fact that Clefable can scout its move with Protect, as can the two Pranksters with Substitute.

    : Countered by Ho-Oh, Groudon's Overheat can also often KO it by surprise, and Arceus-Water removes any hazards it sets up with Defog. Once the Thorn Pod Pokémon has been burned by Arceus-Water's Will-O-Wisp, it also becomes significantly easier to overcome with SwagPlay.

    : Countered and beaten by Ho-Oh, though it is admittedly extremely annoying as it can end SwagPlay cycles with Roar.

    : Every single time In Luck We Trust has faced a Deoxys-S lead, Klefki has set up a Substitute against it before proceeding to KO it with two Foul Plays while it sets up hazards, before those hazards get removed by Arceus-Water later.

    : Groudon and Ho-Oh both threaten it, and Arceus-Water's Will-O-Wisp makes life difficult for it. Also, there is a very cheap and effective trick involving Klefki or Thundurus-I with which one can easily dispose of Aegislash, and that involves simply using Substitute with the Prankster to block an attack from Aegislash while exposing its Blade form, before outrunning and knocking it out on the very next turn with Foul Play, assuming the opponent does not use King's Shield, of course, although they would be hesitant to do so in fear of letting the SwagPlayer set up a free Substitute, in which case it can then begin the SwagPlay cycle.

    : The main way to beat it is to burn it with Arceus-Water. If Mega Kangaskhan uses Power-Up Punch, Clefable can wall it after it has been burned. Ho-Oh and Groudon can also beat it with their attacks after it has been paralyzed, though one must be careful of any Power-Up Punch-boosted Sucker Punches. It should also be noted that, unless the odds are significantly in a SwagPlayer's favor, such as if Klefki or Thundurus-I is already behind a Substitute and Mega Kangaskhan is already paralyzed, it is generally not a wise idea to try to beat the Parent Pokémon with SwagPlay unless one is really desperate, due to Mega Kangaskhan's ability to break a SwagPlayer's Substitute with the first hit of their attack, before hitting the SwagPlayer with the second hit, which will be devastating after the Attack boost from Swagger.

    : With no entry hazards on In Luck We Trust's field, something which only takes a single Defog from Arceus-Water to achieve, one can switch repeatedly between this team's Klefki and Clefable until the opponent's SwagKey runs out of PPs. Alternatively, one can often just outright beat an opposing SwagKey with this team's own Speed-creeping Klefki. As for Spikes-stacking and/or dual screens Klefki, they can be annoying, but can be easily taken out with Groudon or Ho-Oh, while any status or entry hazards they spread can be removed later with Heal Bell and Defog respectively.

    : Though it can be annoying with Toxic, Arceus-Water counters this Stealth Rock user, and can burn any Pokémon Landorus-T switches out to.

    : Its Dragon Dance set cannot sweep this team due to the two Pranksters with Thunder Wave, while the Sky High Pokémon's Swords Dance and mixed sets are countered by Arceus-Water. Ho-Oh also easily picks off any paralyzed Rayquaza as long as they are not the Swords Dance variant.

    : Countered by Ho-Oh unless it has Stone Edge, Arceus-Water more or less holds it off and annoys it with burns, and its most common set is setup bait for Klefki.

    : Unbelievably annoying in respect to the fact that it is absolutely impossible to beat it with SwagPlay, but Life Orb Ho-Oh is Chansey's greatest enemy in In Luck We Trust. Though if the opponent does have a Pokémon that hard-counters Ho-Oh, such as Arceus-Rock, one should be prepared to fight an extremely long battle while investing an incredible amount of concentration into the match, planning ahead and double-switching in hope to eventually break the opponent's stall after a very, very lengthy battle which will almost surely last more than 100 turns. Never forget that as long as the opponent's Chansey remains alive, there is no hope whatsoever of sweeping with Klefki or Thundurus-I, so utilize all of one's wits to pressure the opponent until their Chansey faints.

    : Groudon and Ho-Oh beat it, though the latter must watch out for Stone Edge. Arceus-Water can render Mega Lucario useless with Will-O-Wisp, and the two Pranksters threaten to paralyze the Aura Pokémon, giving Groudon, Ho-Oh, and to a lesser extent Arceus-Water a much easier time beating it.


    Last edited by Immanent God LANCE on Tue 29 Sep - 14:28; edited 3 times in total
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    10detta
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    Re: In Luck We Trust (XY Ubers)

    Post by 10detta on Mon 16 Jun - 16:24

    Well-written and comprehensive RMT as always.
    Cool that you finally RMT'd this team that I've heard so much about, yet have seen so little action of.

    I admire how your non-swagger mons actually contribute to the swagmons' synergy and support, which makes the team stand out and work effectively in the metagame.

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    Lord Itachi
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    Re: In Luck We Trust (XY Ubers)

    Post by Lord Itachi on Mon 16 Jun - 17:55

    Awesome analysis.
    Well its better to say its a guide for XY Ubers.Was never able to defeat ur luck.


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    Re: In Luck We Trust (XY Ubers)

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